Cool things I read this week (01-Feb-2015)

I read. A lot. And I share the five best things I read every week. This week’s topics are about testing, Apple, space exploration, science and a somewhat mathematical poem.

1. On the easy way and the fallacy of the simple
2. Apple’s original business plan
3. NASA mission to Europa!
4. Scott Adams on science and credibility
5. A mathematical poem


My notes:

1. On the easy way and the fallacy of the simple
Pete Walen writes about the fallacy of the simple. I have felt this so often in my career. Over the years I have gotten better at handling the “Let’s just do …” better. But I still have a way to go. Side note: Of late Pete Walen’s writing and Twitter feed seem to indicate he is working on changing the culture at his current work place. Just a hunch based on my experience doing something similar.

2. Apple’s original business plan
Apple recently announced the best quarter (in terms of net profit) for any corporation in the history of ever. $18 billion in net profit! I found it interesting to read through their original plan. My favorite part is in the ‘Staff’ section. A certain S.P.Jobs is cleverly listed as ‘Attended Reed college and Stanford’.

3. NASA mission to Europa!
Yes! Yes!! Yessssssss!!! Mankind is going to Jupiter’s famous moon – Europa. I find space fascinating and this news had me excited this week. I like NASA for space travel and for the fact that the first software testing team started in NASA under the great Jerry Weinberg.

4. Scott Adams on science and credibility
Scott Adams writes about why science has such low credibility with the masses. I work in healthcare IT. I can relate to this. And so much. Care providers and physicians do not trust technology. Nor do they see technology as an ally. I think technology in general has low credibility because, as Scott Adams puts it:

If you kick me in the balls for 20-years, how do you expect me to close my eyes and trust you?

5. A mathematical poem
A change from the regular cartoon. This week I read a poem with a Fibonacci sequence of words.


Arunkumar Muralidharan
I want to find out what conditions produce remarkable software. A few years ago, I chose to work as the first professional tester at a startup. I successfully won credibility for testers and established a world class team. I have lead the testing for early versions of multiple products. Today, I run Qxf2 Services. Qxf2 provides software testing services for startups. If you are interested in what Qxf2 offers or simply want to talk about testing, you can contact me at: mak@qxf2.com. I like testing, math, chess and dogs.

© 2013-2017, Arunkumar Muralidharan. All rights reserved.

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